“God’s plan is to bring everything together under Christ. And each one of us plays a part in that sacred plan.

Our faith is a beautiful, developing drama, a beauty whose end we cannot see. Starting with the first day of creation, the Word of God has been slowly emerging down the ages. The Word has become visible in the Incarnation and will reach its full revelation when Jesus returns in glory on the last day.”

—from the essay “John Duns Scotus: His View of Christ” by Friar Jack Wintz

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“When we contemplate the sufferings of Jesus He grants us, according to the measure of our faith, the grace to practice the virtues He revealed during those sacred hours.”

— St. Angela Merici

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“Now, as he [St. Francis] was riding one day over the plain of Assisi he met a leper, whose sudden appearance filled him with fear and horror; but forthwith calling to mind the resolution which he had made to follow after perfection, and remembering that if he would be a soldier of Christ he must first overcome himself, he dismounted from his horse and went to meet the leper, that he might embrace him: and when the poor man stretched out his hand to receive an alms, he kissed it and filled it with money. Having again mounted his horse, he looked around him over the wide and open plain, but nowhere could he see the leper; upon which, being filled with wonder and joy, he began devoutly to give thanks to God, purposing within himself to proceed to still greater things than this.”

— St. Bonaventure

 

 

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“God knows the dangers that surround our souls. He doesn’t want anything to impede the goal of our spiritual life: union with him. God knows our every weakness and our need for continuous, loving guidance to avoid the dangers that threaten our chances of spending eternity with him in heaven. God longs to be in relationship with us. As a loving parent, he protects us and shields us from harm. Through Jesus, our Savior, he calls us his friends. His Holy Spirit moves in us, with us, through us.”

–from the book Created to Relate: God’s Design for Peace and Joy by Kelly M. Wahlquist

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“In this life our lot is not to enjoy God, but to do his holy will.”

— St. Teresa of Avila

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“I desire that you know more profoundly the love that burns in My Heart for souls, and you will understand this when you meditate upon My Passion. Call upon My mercy on behalf of sinners; I desire their salvation. When you say this prayer, with a contrite heart and with faith on behalf of some sinner, I will give him the grace of conversion. This is the prayer: ‘O Blood and Water, which gushed forth from the Heart of Jesus as a fount of Mercy for us, I trust in You.‘ ”

— St. Faustina Kowalska

 

 

“Mary’s is the ultimate birth story. She walked through her life at Jesus’ side, loving him with a real human love and at the same time understanding his divine purpose. She bore the tension of living in perfect joy and complete sorrow as she watched her baby boy become our Redeemer. Mary continues to offer herself as an example of what we can be if we too will open our hearts for him to draw near and dwell in us.”

—from Who Does He Say You Are? Women Transformed by Christ in the Gospels by Colleen C. Mitchell

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“Guard against anger. But if it cannot be averted, let it be kept within bounds. For indignation is a terrible incentive to sin. It disorders the mind to such an extent as to leave no room for reason.”

— St. Ambrose

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“No creature ever loved Jesus Christ more ardently, nor showed more perfect submission to His will, than Mary, His mother. If then, this Savior, immolated for us sinners, gave His mother to us, an advocate and intercessor for all time, she cannot but comply with His request, and will not refuse us her assistance. Let us, then, not hesitate to implore her pity; let us have recourse to her with great confidence in all our necessities, as she is an inexhaustible source of blessing, bestowing her favors in proportion to the confidence placed in her.”

— Dom Lorenzo Scupoli

 

“True humility and obedience have to do with putting others—God and people—ahead of oneself. Blessed Solanus Casey lived those words. Near the end of his life, he said, “I look on my whole life as giving, and I want to give and give until there is nothing left of me to give. God knows best, and, while we’ll still hope for a favorable surprise, we can hardly do better than not only being resigned to whatever God permits, but even beforehand to thank Him for His mercifully loving designs.”

God’s Doorkeepers: Padre Pio, Solanus Casey and André Bessette by Joel R. Schorn

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“We should strive to keep our hearts open to the sufferings and wretchedness of other people, and pray continually that God may grant us that spirit of compassion which is truly the spirit of God.”

— St. Vincent de Paul

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“When uncertain about God’s will, it is very important that we tell ourselves: ‘Even if there are aspects of God’s will that escape me, there are always others that I know for sure and can invest in without any risk, knowing that this investment always pays dividends.’ These certainties include fulfilling the duties of our state in life and practicing the essential points of every Christian vocation. There is a defect here that needs to be recognized and avoided: finding ourselves in darkness about God’s will on an important question . . . we spend so much time searching and doubting or getting discouraged, that we neglect things that are God’s will for us every day, like being faithful to prayer, maintaining trust in God, loving the people around us here and now. Lacking answers about the future, we should prepare to receive them by living today to the full.”

— Fr. Jacques Philippe

 

 

“It is interesting that our Lord asked the man if he wanted to be well. Wouldn’t it seem obvious that he wanted healing since he had been hurting for decades? Why else would he have been there?

And, since Jesus is God, he already knew whether or not the man desired a cure. He knows what is in the heart of every human being. He did not need to ask because he knew; he asked for the man’s sake rather than his own. He wanted the man to examine himself and decide whether or not he wanted to be well. He wanted the sick man to participate in his own healing.”

—from Forgiving Mother: A Marian Novena of Healing and Peace by Marge Steinhage Fenelon

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“Often, actually very often, God allows his greatest servants, those who are far advanced in grace, to make the most humiliating mistakes. This humbles them in their own eyes and in the eyes of their fellow men.”

— St. Louis de Montfort

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“We do not come to church to attend the service as a spectator, but in order, along with the priest, to serve God. Everything we do—our entering, being present, our kneeling and sitting and standing, our reception of the sacred nourishment—should be divine service. This is so only when all we do overflows from the awareness of a collected heart and the mind’s attentiveness.”

— Fr. Romano Guardini

 

 

 

 

“Our world is one that is breaking from pain and sin in every direction we look, it seems. But we do not have to give up hope, because we are women who see. If we will set our hearts on the discipline of prayer and give up the things that keep us from living wholly dependent on him, we will see God in action, recognize him at work, and have the courage to go out and proclaim his presence with great rejoicing.”

—from Who Does He Say You Are? Women Transformed by Christ in the Gospels by Colleen C. Mitchell

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“For a Son of the Immaculate Heart of Mary is a man on fire with love, who spreads its flames wherever he goes. He desires mightily and strives by all means possible to set the whole world on fire with God’s love. Nothing daunts him; he delights in privations, welcomes work, embraces sacrifices, smiles at slander, and rejoices in suffering. His only concern is how he can best follow Jesus Christ and imitate Him in working, suffering, and striving constantly and single-mindedly for the greater glory of God and the salvation of souls.”

— St. Anthony Mary Claret

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“Our Lord, by descending into hell, planted (if I may thus express myself), in the spiritual garden of the Church, a mysterious tree, the fruits of which—namely, His merits—are destined for the constant relief of the Poor Souls in Purgatory. The Church Militant must cultivate the tree, and gather its fruits, in order to present them to that suffering portion of the Church which can do nothing for itself. Thus it is with all the merits of Christ; we must labor with Him if we wish to obtain our share of them; we must gain our bread by the sweat of our brow. Everything which Our Lord has done for us in time must produce fruit for eternity; but we must gather these fruits in time, without which we cannot possess them in eternity. The Church is the most prudent and thoughtful of mothers; the ecclesiastical year is an immense and magnificent garden, in which all those fruits for eternity are gathered together, that we may make use of them in time. Each year contains sufficient to supply the wants of all; but woe be to that careless or dishonest gardener who allows any of the fruit committed to his care to perish; if he fails to turn to a proper account those grace which would restore health to the sick, strength to the weak, or furnish food to the hungry! When the Day of Judgment arrives, the Master of the garden will demand a strict account, not only of every tree, but also of all the fruit produced in the garden.”

— Blessed Anne Catherine Emmerich

 

 

“When he created us, God placed inside us the desire to know him and to be united to him. Just as we experience physical hunger pangs when we need to fuel our bodies, we experience spiritual hunger pangs—angst that nothing in this world can satisfy—when we need to fill our souls.”

—from the book Born to Soar: Unleashing God’s Word in Your Life by Melissa Overmyer

 

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“Persevere in labors that lead to salvation. Always be busy in spiritual actions. In this way, no matter how often the enemy of our souls approaches, no matter how many times he may try to come near us, he’ll find our hearts closed and armed against him.”

— St. Cyprian of Carthage

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“Many are heading straight on for purgatory. They live until their last hour, even though they are seriously ill, even on their deathbed, as if everything is all right. Exclusively directed to the earthly, they don’t think at all about calling upon the mercy of God. Although by doing so they would be spared at least a severe purgatory. For God is infinitely merciful for all who call upon Him and trust Him.”

—from Hungry Souls

 

“Joy is the gist of the Christian Good News. Yet, only if we open wide our senses will we be able to drink from the source of this joy. Only then will the Good News prove truly good and ever new.”

—from the book The Way of Silence: Engaging the Sacred in Daily Life
by Brother David Steindl-Rast

 

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“Never say, ‘What great things the saints do,’ but, ‘What great things God does in His saints.'”

— St. Philip Neri

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“The life of faith is nothing less than the continued pursuit of God through all that disguises, disfigures, destroys and, so to say, annihilates Him. It is in very truth a reproduction of the life of Mary who, from the Stable to the Cross, remained unalterably united to that God whom all the world misunderstood, abandoned, and persecuted. In like manner faithful souls endure a constant succession of trials. God hides beneath veils of darkness and illusive appearances which make His will difficult to recognize; but in spite of every obstacle these souls follow Him and love Him even to the death of the Cross.”

— Fr. Jean-Pierre de Caussade

 

 

 

“Mother Teresa’s was a face demanding that we look, finally, upon the least among us, who are a bother and a reproach, and whose suffering haunts us, and whose suffering continues not because we lack social programs, or scientific advances, or literary or theological wit, but because very few have the strength to bear the shame of failure, of ineffectiveness.

Mother Teresa’s was the face of a woman whose eyes were difficult to read, fathomless, as if behind them burned an unseen light: not a soft glow but a fierce, blistering, scorching conflagration of a light that had been endured for a lifetime—for two thousand years—in silence. It was the face of a woman who had so loved the poor that, at last, she became one of them.”

—from the book Stumble: Virtue, Vice, and the Space Between by Heather King

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“Christ Himself is our mouth through which we speak to the Father, our eye through which we see the Father, our right hand through which we offer to the Father. Without His intercession neither we nor all the saints have anything with God.”

— St. Ambrose

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“Let the sinner know that he will be tortured throughout all eternity, in those senses which he made use of to sin. I am writing this at the command of God, so that no soul may find an excuse by saying there is no hell, or that nobody has ever been there, and so no one can say what it is like. I, Sister Faustina, by the order of God, have visited the abysses of hell so that I might tell souls about it and testify to its existence.”

— St. Faustina Kowalska

 

 

“I would like to emphasize the beauty of a simple contemplative prayer, accessible to all, great and small, the educated and those with little education. It is the prayer of the Holy Rosary. In the Rosary we turn to the Virgin Mary so that she may guide us to an ever closer union with her Son Jesus, to bring us into conformity with him, to have his sentiments and to behave like him. Indeed, in the Rosary while we repeat the Hail Mary we meditate on the Mysteries, on the events of Christ’s life, so as to know and love him ever better.

The Rosary is an effective means for opening ourselves to God, for it  brings peace to hearts, to the family, to society and to the world.”

—Pope Francis

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“Don’t spend your energies on things that generate worry, anxiety and anguish. Only one thing is necessary: Lift up your spirit, and love God.”

— St. Padre Pio

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“We should recall that no man is an island, entire of itself. Our lives are involved with one another, through innumerable interactions they are linked together. No one lives alone. No one sins alone. No one is saved alone. The lives of others continually spill over into mine: in what I think, say, and do, and achieve. And conversely, my life spills over into that of others: for better or for worse. So my prayer for another is not something extraneous to that person, something external, not even after death.”

— Pope Benedict XVI

 

 

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