“By embracing our human condition—in everything but sin—Jesus revealed the new dignity and the surpassing worth of our human condition and the need in love to care for the human person. He tied and linked himself to us forever—to each one of us—by taking on our human flesh. He ennobled the human condition and raised it to the level of his divinity.”

–from the book Meeting God in the Upper Room: Three Moments to Change Your Life

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Helping a person in need is good in itself. But the degree of goodness is hugely affected by the attitude with which it is done. If you show resentment because you are helping the person out of a reluctant sense of duty, then the person may receive your help but may feel awkward and embarrassed. This is because he will feel beholden to you. If, on the other hand, you help the person in a spirit of joy, then the help will be received joyfully. The person will feel neither demeaned nor humiliated by your help, but rather will feel glad to have caused you pleasure by receiving your help. And joy is the appropriate attitude with which to help others because acts of generosity are a source of blessing to the giver as well as the receiver.”

— St. John Chrysostom

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“Teresa [of Avila] is as insistent as [St. John of the Cross] that there is no prayer development unless it be accompanied by purification from faults. Given what a love communion with utter Purity demands, one could not conceive the matter to be otherwise: only the pure can commune deeply with the all-pure One. Obvious as this is to the saint, the lesser of us have difficulty in understanding that we have many defects that need to be rooted out. … In working actively at rooting out what is amiss, we are to be guided by the principles of revelation, not by a naturalistic common sense. There are people, says Teresa, who desire penance that they may serve God the better, but they are overly careful about not injuring their health. ‘You need never fear that they will kill themselves . . . their love is not yet ardent enough to overwhelm their reason.’ Going on ‘at a snail’s pace . . . we shall never get to the end of the road . . . So for the love of the Lord, let us make a real effort.'”

— Fr. Thomas Dubay

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