You are currently browsing the monthly archive for December 2013.

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God’s Imagination by Henri Nouwen

So much of our energy, time, and money goes into maintaining distance from one another.  Many if not most of the resources of the world are used to defend ourselves against each other, to maintain or increase our power, and to safeguard our own privileged position.

Imagine all that effort being put in the service of peace and reconciliation!  Would there be any poverty?  Would there be crimes and wars?  Just imagine that there was no longer fear among people, no longer any rivalry, hostility, bitterness, or revenge.  Just imagine all the people on this planet holding hands and forming one large circle of love.   We say, “I can’t imagine.”  But God says,  “That’s what I imagine, a whole world not only created but also living in my image.”

emphasis mine

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Letting Go of Old Hurts by Henri Nouwen

One of the hardest things in life is to let go of old hurts.  We often say, or at least think:  “What you did to me and my family, my ancestors, or my friends I cannot forget or forgive. … One day you will have to pay for it.”  Sometimes our memories are decades, even centuries, old and keep asking for revenge.

Holding people’s faults against them often creates an impenetrable wall.  But listen to Paul:  “For anyone who is in Christ, there is a new creation:  the old order is gone and a new being is there to see.  It is all God’s work” (2 Corinthians 5:17-18).  Indeed, we cannot let go of old hurts, but God can.  Paul says:  “God was in Christ reconciling the world to himself, not holding anyone’s fault against them” (2 Corinthians 5:19).  It is God’s work, but we are God’s ministers, because the God who reconciled the world to God entrusted to us “the message of reconciliation” (2 Corinthians 5:19).  This message calls us to let go of old hurts in the Name of God.  It is the message our world most needs to hear.

emphasis mine

 

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A Ministry That Never Ends by Henri Nouwen

Reconciliation is much more than a one-time event by which a conflict is resolved and peace established.  A ministry of reconciliation goes far beyond problem solving, mediation, and peace agreements.  There is not a moment in our lives without the need for reconciliation.  When we dare to look at the myriad hostile feelings and thoughts in our hearts and minds, we will immediately recognize the many little and big wars in which we take part.  Our enemy can be a parent, a child, a “friendly” neighbor, people with different lifestyles, people who do not think as we think, speak as we speak, or act as we act.  They all can become “them.”  Right there is where reconciliation is needed.

 Reconciliation touches the most hidden parts of our souls.  God gave reconciliation to us as a ministry that never ends.

emphasis mine

 

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Being Safe Places for Others by Henri Nouwen

When we are free from the need to judge or condemn, we can become safe places for people to meet in vulnerability and take down the walls that separate them.   Being deeply rooted in the love of God, we cannot help but invite people to love one another.  When people realise that we have no hidden agendas or unspoken intentions, that we are not trying to gain any profit for ourselves, and that our only desire is for peace and reconciliation, they may find the inner freedom and courage to leave their guns at the door and enter into conversation with their enemies.

Many times this happens even without our planning.  Our ministry of reconciliation most often takes place when we ourselves are least aware of it.  Our simple, nonjudgmental presence does it.

emphasis mine

 

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A Nonjudgmental Presence by Henri Nouwen

To the degree that we accept that through Christ we ourselves have been reconciled with God we can be messengers of reconciliation for others.  Essential to the work of reconciliation is a nonjudgmental presence.  We are not sent to the world to judge, to condemn, to evaluate, to classify, or to label.  When we walk around as if we have to make up our mind about people and tell them what is wrong with them and how they should change, we will only create more division.   Jesus says it clearly:  “Be compassionate just as your Father is compassionate.  Do not judge; … do not condemn; … forgive” (Luke 6:36-37).

In a world that constantly asks us to make up our minds about other people, a nonjudgmental presence seems nearly impossible.  But it is one of the most beautiful fruits of a deep spiritual life and will be easily  recognized by those who long for reconciliation.

emphasis mine

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Claiming our Reconciliation by Henri Nouwen

How do we work for reconciliation?  First and foremost by claiming for ourselves that God through Christ has reconciled us to God.  It is not enough to believe this with our heads.  We have to let the truth of this reconciliation permeate every part of our beings.  As long as we are not fully and thoroughly convinced that we have been reconciled with God, that we are forgiven, that we have received new hearts,  new spirits, new eyes to see, and new ears to hear, we continue to create divisions among people because we expect from them a healing power they do not possess.

Only when we fully trust that we belong to God and can find in our relationship with God all that we need for our minds, hearts, and souls, can we be truly free in this world and be ministers of reconciliation.   This is not easy; we readily fall back into self-doubt and self-rejection.  We need to be constantly reminded through God’s Word, the sacraments, and the love of our neighbours that we are indeed reconciled.

emphasis mine

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Christmas At Genesee Abbey by Henri Nouwen

I keep thinking about the Christmas scene that Anthony arranged under the altar. This probably is the most meaningful “crib” I have ever seen. Three small wood-carved figures made in India: a poor woman, a poor man, and a small child between them. The carving is simple, nearly primitive. No eyes, no ears, no mouths, just the contours of the faces. The figures are smaller than a human hand – nearly too small to attract attention at all.

But then – a beam of light shines on the three figures and projects large shadows on the wall of the sanctuary. That says it all. The light thrown on the smallness of Mary, Joseph, and the Child projects them as large, hopeful shadows against the walls of our life and our world. 

While looking at the intimate scene we already see the first outlines of the majesty and glory they represent. While witnessing the most human of human events, I see the majesty of God appearing on the horizon of my existence. While being moved by the gentleness of these three people, I am already awed by the immense greatness of God’s love appearing in my world. Without the radiant beam of light shining into the darkness there is little to be seen. I might just pass by these three simple people and continue to walk in darkness. But everything changes with the light.
emphasis mine

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The Task of Reconciliation by Henri Nouwen

What is our task in this world as children of God and brothers and sisters of Jesus?  Our task is reconciliation.  Wherever we go we see divisions among people – in families, communities, cities, countries, and continents.  All these divisions are tragic reflections of our separation from God.  The truth that all people belong together as members of one family under God is seldom visible.  Our sacred task is to reveal that truth in the reality of everyday life.  

Why is that our task?  Because God sent Christ to reconcile us with God and to give us the task of reconciling people with one another.   As people reconcile with God through Christ we have been given the ministry of reconciliation” (see: 2 Corinthians 5:18).  So whatever we do the main question is, Does it lead to reconciliation among people?

emphasis mine

 

 

Life is unpredictable.  We can be happy one day and sad the next, healthy one day and sick the next, rich one day and poor the next, alive one day and dead the next.  So who is there to hold on to?  Who is there to feel secure with?  Who is there to trust at all times?

Only Jesus, the Christ.  He is our Lord, our shepherd, our rock, our stronghold, our refuge, our brother, our guide, and our friend.  He came from God to be with us.  He died for us, he was raised from the dead to open for us the way to God, and he is seated at God’s right hand to welcome us home.   With Paul, we must be certain that “neither death nor life, nor angels, nor principalities, nothing already in existence and nothing still to come, nor any power, nor the heights nor the depths, nor any created thing whatever, will be able to come between us and the love of God, known to us in Christ Jesus our Lord”  (Romans 8:38-39).

emphasis mine

Jesus is the vulnerable child, the humble preacher, the despised, rejected, and crucified Christ.  But Jesus also is “the image of the unseen God, the first-born of all creation, … [who] exists before all things and in him all things hold together”  (Colossians 1:15,17).   Jesus is the King, ridiculed on the cross and reigning from his throne in the heavenly Jerusalem.  He is the Lord riding into the city on a donkey, and the Alpha and Omega, the Beginning and the End.  He is cursed by the world but blessed by God.

Let’s always look at Jesus, because in his crucified and glorified heart we will see ourselves called to share in his suffering as well as in his glory.

emphasis mine

Who can deny how gently
tender petals float on the wind?
Yet each day more flowers fall,

withered and dying.
Even the leaves
remain where they drop.

Is this not a sign?

Gone—
the pinks of summer.

The wind blows colder now
and hardly for the better.
Stiff brown leaves crunch,

but look—look,

a Rose of Sharon blossoms
from a Virgin’s womb.

And the wonder of it is
it happened just like that.

first published in Domicile and later in Better With Friends

December 2013
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