You are currently browsing the daily archive for September 6, 2011.

Often we remain silent when we need to speak.  Without words, it is hard to love well.  When we say to our parents, children, lovers, or friends:  “I love you very much” or “I care for you” or “I think of you often” or “You are my greatest gift,” we choose to give life.

It is not always easy to express our love directly in words.  But whenever we do, we discover we have offered a blessing that will be long remembered.  When a son can say to his father,  “Dad, I love you,” and when a mother can say to her daughter, “Child, I love you,” a whole new blessed place can be opened up, a space where it is good to dwell.  Indeed, words have the power to create life.

A new review of Seriously Dangerous by Maria Garcia Rouphail has been posted on Rattle: Poetry for the 21st Century.

“Poetry lovers will surely delight in Seriously Dangerous, Helen Losse’s latest collection of deftly sculpted lyric poems. Throughout this volume of 47 mostly short works, Losse reveals a sensibility that is at once intensely spiritual and concrete. Rooted in the natural world and often exhibiting abundant painterly detail, Losse’s poems are eloquent statements about life in the body—both individual and the collective. Life in its myriad private and public scenarios undergoes a thorough exploration, which the poet expresses with economical, sometimes deadpan, frankness as in the mordant poem, “Spin, Spin, Spin”:

People with crosses have
various purposes.
We know that most are dangerous,
except for the chosen few
God actually likes.

……..

“To read Helen Losse’s poems is to savor an eloquent voice. Nowhere is this voice more contemplative than in “Where Light is Going”:

It would be easier to speak as others believe,
not to feel the ocean’s intentions nor to sense
the pull of the moon. Grace abounds in ocean,
in flotsam, in rich sea foam, floats in earth’s
swirling dust . . . .

Ultimately, Seriously Dangerous embodies mindfulness of the connectedness of all things and of the urgency for each of us to be open to what is without forgetting what has been.”

read the entire review

Many thanks to Maria Garcia Rouphail, who is on the English Department faculty at North Carolina State University, where she teaches in the World Literature program

 

 

 

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