“In the first place it should be known that if a person is seeking God, his beloved is seeking him much more.”

— St. John of the Cross

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“The Lord moves within our hearts, conforming them to the Sacred Heart of his Son and building a beautiful reciprocity between the giving of ourselves and the giving of himself. Jesus said we will always know what to say concerning him, and that comes from our hearts resting in his. The infusion of knowledge happens so gradually, so subtly, that we are almost completely unaware. We only know that we must spend time with him, that we must listen attentively to the Scriptures, and that we must participate in the life of the community he has formed into his body. We must, because we know that if we do not, we will die.”

—from Prayer Everywhere: The Spiritual Life Made Simple

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“[The] ultimate end of man we call beatitude. For a man’s happiness or beatitude consists in the vision whereby he sees God in His essence. Of course, man is far below God in the perfection of his beatitude. For God has this beatitude by His very nature, whereas man attains beatitude by being admitted to a share in the divine light.”

— St. Thomas Aquinas

 

 

 

 

 

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“Each of you knows that the foundation of our faith is charity. Without it, our religion would crumble. We will never be truly Catholic unless we conform our entire lives to the two commandments that are the essence of the Catholic faith: to love the Lord, our God, with all our strength, and to love our neighbor as ourselves.”

— Blessed Pier Giorgio Frassati

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“Know, dearest daughter, how, by humble, continual, and faithful prayer, the soul aquires, with time and perseverance, every virtue. Wherefore should she persevere and never abandon prayer.”

— St. Catherine Of Siena

 

“So preoccupied had I been with Assisi that I couldn’t see beyond it to the goal of everything, that other threshold, that border where earth and heaven meet. The mountain is the symbol of that apogee in the soul where we meet God. This is not to denigrate or dismiss what is below, but to lift it up and give thanks to God for all that God has made; to bless it and praise God and see that everything is good because it comes from God and ultimately leads us beyond itself to the God who made it and redeems it. What is below makes the mountain. It does not rest on air, on spirit, but on matter, which is the mountain’s way to the heights of union with God. The mountain affirms incarnation, the entering of God into all that God has made.”

—from Enter Assisi: An Invitation to Franciscan Spirituality

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“It is suffering, more than anything else, which clears the way for the grace which transforms human souls. Suffering, more than anything else makes present in the history of humanity the powers of the Redemption.”

— Pope St. John Paul II

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“Be faithful to the time spent in prayer and make sure that at least half of your prayer is spent in silence. This will bring you closer to Jesus. If you deepen your prayer life you will grow in holiness and obtain many graces for the souls entrusted to your care. Deepen your love for one another by praying for each other and by sharing thoughts and graces you have received in prayer and reading.”

— Bl. Mother Teresa of Calcutta

Please consider this an invitation to zip on over to my FaceBook page.

“Prayer is almost as much a mystery as God. Prayer always seems to be more than the words we use to describe it or the ways in which we understand it. Prayer is as old as the human family, stretching all the way back to the fall of Adam and Eve. Prior to disobeying God, our first parents lived in friendship with him. The intimacy they shared precluded the need for prayer. Their sin, however, produced a chasm between themselves and God. Because God created them to share his life, the desire for him not only remained, it also intensified. St. Augustine describes this as a restlessness within the human heart that can only be satisfied by resting in God. We can say, therefore, with a fair degree of certainty that prayer is the action that enables communication between that which is human and that which is divine.”

—from Prayer Everywhere: The Spiritual Life Made Simple

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“Cast yourself into the arms of God and be very sure that if He wants anything of you, He will fit you for the work and give you strength.”

— St. Philip Neri

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“Do not be scared of the word authority. Believing things on authority only means believing them because you have been told them by someone you think trustworthy. Ninety-nine per cent of the things you believe are believed on authority. … We believe them simply because people who did see them have left writings that tell us about them: in fact, on authority. A man who jibbed at authority in other things as some people do in religion would have to be content to know nothing all his life.”

— C.S. Lewis

 

 

 

“O God, who gave Saint Anthony of Padua a love for the sacred Scriptures and the gift of teaching them, give us a love for your holy word and a deep desire to encounter you. Through his intercession, help us to find what we have lost and especially to remain in possession of the truest good, peace of spirit and the grace of salvation. Show us, through your saint, what it means to live in Jesus Christ, who humbled and emptied himself for our sakes and the sake of the whole world. Amen.”

–from Saint Junipero Serra’s Camino: A Pilgrimage Guide to the California  Missions

“One of the most grave and disturbing things I have encountered as a priest is the number of people that do not believe God loves them. Far too many people think that they must first prove their love to God before God will extend himself to them. Every time I meet people shocked by the truth that God loves them, it breaks my priestly heart. How could they not know that God loves us in his Son, even while we were yet (and are still) sinners?”

—from Prayer Everywhere: The Spiritual Life Made Simple

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“Viva Cristo Rey! — Long live Christ the King!”

— Blessed Miguel Pro

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To love God’s will in consolations is a good love when it is truly God’s will we love and not the consolation wherein it lies. Still, it is a love without opposition, repugnance, or effort. Who would not love so worthy a will in so agreeable a form? To love God’s will in His commandments, counsels, and inspirations is the second degree of love and it is much more perfect. It carries us forward to renounce and give up our own will, and enables us to abstain from and forbear many pleasures, but not all of them. To love suffering and affliction out of love for God is the summit of most holy charity. In it nothing is pleasant but the divine will alone; there is great opposition on the part of our nature; and not only do we forsake all pleasures, but we embrace torments and labors.”

— St. Francis de Sales

 

 

“All these gates led me finally to return to the entrance of another “cave” where Saint Francis is buried, in a crypt inside a hill outside the original walls of Assisi. It is a cave that, like all the others, reveals to us the treasure which is the Gospel of Jesus Christ that sends us forth from Assisi, as it did Francis, to return to our original true place and find there the way into our own mountain where we find the Spirit of God who will send us forth, beyond our own protective walls, to find the poor among us and beyond us, beyond, at least, our former seeing and living.

And at some point we have to return to Assisi, at least in memory or imagination, and pass through the Capuchin Gate, hopefully in a springtime of the soul, and begin the slow ascent of Mount Subasio and reenter the caves of St. Francis looking for renewed energy and inspiration, for the silence and solitude that send us back to the plain below, to those, especially, who have no lightsome place to lay their head.”

—from Enter Assisi: An Invitation to Franciscan Spirituality

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“If you are suffering from a bad man’s injustice, forgive him—lest there be two bad men.”
— St. Augustine

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“My God, you know infinitely better than I how little I love you. I would not love you at all except for your grace. It is your grace that has opened the eyes of my mind and enabled them to see your glory. It is your grace that has touched my heart and brought upon it the influence of what is so wonderfully beautiful and fair . . . O my God, whatever is nearer to me than you, things of this earth, and things more naturally pleasing to me, will be sure to interrupt the sight of you, unless your grace interferes. Keep my eyes, my ears, my heart from any such miserable tyranny. Break my bonds—raise my heart. Keep my whole being fixed on you. Let me never lose sight of you; and, while I gaze on you, let my love of you grow more and more everyday.”

— Bl. John Henry Cardinal Newman

 

 

“The most deadly poison of our time is indifference. And this happens although the praise of God should know no limits. Let us strive, therefore, to praise him to the greatest extent of our powers.”

— St. Maximilian Kolbe

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“If, then, we wish to persevere and to be saved—for no one can be saved without perseverance—we must pray continually. Our perseverance depends, not on one grace, but on a thousand helps which we hope to obtain from God during our whole lives, that we may be preserved in his grace. Now, to this chain of graces a chain of prayers on our part must correspond: without these prayers, God ordinarily does not grant his graces. If we neglect to pray, and thus break the chain of prayers, the chain of graces shall also be broken, and we shall lose the grace of perseverance.”

— St. Alphonsus Liguori

 

“That is very simply what a pilgrim does: walk. And it is the way the pilgrim prays, with his or her feet. And the feet walk through dark clouds to illumination to the light that is holy action. Through dark, cloud-filled days to a hint of subtle lightening to the sun breaking through, the feet taking us where we least thought we’d go, where before we had thought darkness dwelt, and finding there instead, in bright sunlight, the broken, the poor, the marginal, those made ugly or disfigured by abuse and oppression and woundedness.

We are changed simply by walking, rain or shine, toward and back from whatever shrine we had thought contained our hope and longing. We walk back toward what was there all along that we could not see.”

—from Enter Assisi: An Invitation to Franciscan Spirituality

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